I Articles I Classifieds I Dance Reviews I Music Reviews I Free E-Mail I Guest Book I
I Home Pages I Art India Net Home I Indian Cinema I Online Chat I

PURE JOY TRADITIONAL INDIAN SITAR

ARTISTE: DR. CHANDRA KANT SARDESHMUKH

PUBLISHER: DARSHANAM [1998]

Reviewed by Dr. Ragini Trivedi

 

Though it is true that Hindustani classical music is based on Samvaad Sidhhant (Consonance), in modern time a number of artistes have chosen to go against the rules. They have exerted the right of an artiste to be dictated only by his creativity. However, as Eliot would have it, a work of art is valuable only if it is rich both in individuality and tradition. A child prodigy, who began his musical career at an early age of four, Dr. Chandrakant Sardeshmukh surprised the maestro himself -- Pandit Ravishankar -- into taking him under his tutelage when he was just eight. A Samvedic scholar, Sardeshmukh proves once again in his latest release, Pure Joy that this prodigy still retains as an adult the joy of child's first discovery of that magical wand with strings -- the Sitar.

Experimentation and innovation are built within the system of Indian classical music which is disciplined yet liberal, allowing space and inspiration for imagination. In Pure Joy, a CD of sitar recital published by Darshanam, Dr. Chandra Kant Sardeshmukh has displayed both imagination and skill. He adeptly combines various Raagas in the first track entitled Kirwani with Ragamala . The blending of one kind of notes into another are sometimes like a bud defoliating its bashfulness to bloom in its own right, at others like vivacity of youth acquiescing to wisdom of age. This concept of Ragamala finds full exhibition, with third and sixth minor [Komal Ga and Dha] and perfect fourth [Shuddha Ma] of Kirwani finding an antithesis in third and sixth major and sharp fourth [Teevra Ma] of Yaman, before reverting to perfect fourth [Shuddha Ma] in Khamaj. The sitarist then blending first into Hansadhwani and later to Miyan Ki Malhar makes use of his poetic license to contrast the majestic notes of these Raagas with notes of frolic and gaiety in Tilak Kamod and Jog. Where a traditionalist would have avoided mixing Raagas of major and minor third, Dr. Sardeshmukh's rendering is competent enough to handle this.

The second track entitled Sihendra Madhyam carries on the mood of joyous abandonment of the Raagmala of the earlier track. The artiste is, however, more conscious of the charisma he is creating in this composition of Ardh Shikhar Taal of eight and half beats. The strokes are strong and yet not jarring, the pace more controlled. Sardeshmukh performs the masonry with a clear vision of the Xanadu (sunny cavern with walls of ice) he is going to create. With shadow of a Nat-Bhairawa in the Mandra Saptak, this Raaga generally emulates Kirwani with a Teevra Ma.

The final track honours the tradition of all night sittings, of celebrating the light of day with a Bhairavi. The Joy of Sardeshmukh is indeed so Pure, that one begins to sympathise with Shelley who hankered after that blithe spirit without ever hoping to find its music on this earth. Here is a presentaation that might have satisfied the great Romantic.The frequent use of semi-tones in the last track, gives rise to this ethereal quality, at times, surreal.

I Articles I Classifieds I Dance Reviews I Music Reviews I Free E-Mail I Guest Book I
I Home Pages I Art India Net Home I Indian Cinema I Online Chat I

Dr. Ragini TrivediDr. Ragini Trivedi has been teaching post-graduate classes in government colleges in Madhya Pradesh since 1987. An approved artiste of Akashvani, she has also given Sitar performances on stage at Bhopal, Indore, Varanansi, Mumbai, Mysore etc. during this period.